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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
who was formerly osama bin laden's secretary. we know that there was chatter. but we don't know the most important things. exactly where, exactly when. so we've seen a blanket response in much of the muslim world and the question is how long can you keep this up. these kind of attacks, these militants, aren't going to be deterred for very long. this might throw off their game. it might, according to analysts we've been speaking to, cause them to change their timing but al qaeda in the iranian peninsula has been there for several years and has been very aggressive for the last several years. >> pete williams, we know that they were increasing security on flights coming from overseas to the united states. they don't see a domestic component to this. but a lot of people are wondering, we know that osama bin laden stopped his people from using cell phones. so what kind of communications -- what kifbd ch kind of chatt eter is intercept presumably from the nsa? >> we don't know if this is on the phone, is it e-mails or some other kind of communication we aren't thinking about. i'm tol
with terrorists, killing osama bin laden. en even this question of al qaeda's number two, ayman al zawahiri, there was a meeting the president attend wrd he wanted more vigilance in this fight. as tom donnelly would tell me, obama said here's the deal. i want this hunt for osama bin laden and ayman al zawahiri to come to the front of the line. i worry that the trail has gone cold. this has to be our top priority. you need to ensure that we have expended every effort to take down the top leadership of al qaeda, especially these two individuals. in light of your criticism about overreaction, there is still a very specific threat and a very specific operator who is atop these organizations. >> and there continue to be a specific threat and there will continue to be terrorism as there has been for as long as human history exists. terrorism is simply the weapon by which the weak engage the strong. and what they do is they cause the strong, in this case us, to overreact. we are the one who is went into iraq and spent about a trillion and a half dollars doing it, losing, what, 2,500 -- 4,500 young
had been worth despite osama bin lauden. where do we draw the line? >> i think not just the ambiguous outcomes in the wars in afghanistan but also the libyan situation in which they thought we were doing good in the world, and we helped overthrow gaddafi, and then we had ambassador chris stevens, who was really a hero in the benghazi area killed in that very city when he was ambassador and then they have seen egypt and yemen erupt and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these
, the first time a global alert was issued since osama bin laden was killed in may 2011. joining me nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel. nice to have you this morning, richard. >> reporter: thank you. good to join you from a very hot day in cairo but i'm glad to be on your show. >> thanks. tell me a little, obviously we first started hearing about embassies closing beginning thursday night, then got hot sort of all day on friday. what is the administration saying about the scope of these embassy closings. >> the scope of the embassy closings, nbc consulate is very large. about 22 different facilities closed just today, although we're not exactly sure when some of these facilities will reopen. we spoke to a spokesperson today here in cairo and asked, okay, there is a closure. when is the embassy going to reopen. the spokesperson said, well, we're still evaluating. this is a blanket move. it is obviously very serious. what we know from talking to different sources is that the threat goes back to yemen. it's a very specific threat from al qaeda in the arabian peninsula, which is
of afghanistan and pakistan. that is no longer the case. osama bin laden is no longer their plotting against the u.s. and our allies. a does not mean there is not continuing threat posed by al qaeda, but that does not mean but that threat has changed because of the president's willingness to use force. there are other ways to work with the international community to reach objectives. the president took a trip to africa where he highlighted some of the strong relationships the united states has there. this is the work that the president vowed to do when he took office, which is to rebuild some of the relationships that were in tatters when this president entered the oval office. that strengthens the united states on the international scene. it is good for broader national security interests. but it is something that the president and members of his team have to work on something -- have to work on every day. >> more than 100,000 people have been killed. that is effectively like wiping out the entire city of south bend, indiana. how many more people need to die before the u.s. does employ some
in "the washington post" offering more detail about the raid that killed osama bin laden, it says forensic intelligence agents working in afghanistan confirmed his identity eight hours after he was killed using dna from his corpse. "the post" information is based on data from leaker edward snowden. >>> friday marks san diego mayor bob filner's final day in office at 5:00, city council president todd gloria will take over as interim mayor and a special election is set for november 19th. gloria allred is celebrating his last day, she represents several women harassed by filner. >>> new york is a great place but it took a couple of kittens to shut down the subway, service came to a halt thursday for 90 minutes as they looked for the fugitive fee lines, the rail could be deadly to an unsuspecting cat. at first there was no luck finding the kittens but they were found hours later and taken to a local animal shelter. it would really anger commuters, but come on, look at that face. >> got to save the kittens. good stuff. >> and they did. that's some good news. we'll take a break here on "new day.
in places even if osama bin laden is not. one other point in there that is not discussed is central africa and what is going on there. >> and malwi and nigeria. >> how does the president need to come out of this to gain credibility and not letting as the congressman said every death spot around the world to utilize destruction. >> that is the quandary he finds himself. this is a president who he first was in power put his faith in word. he thought he could talk the world down from the -- and to some degree, his hands were tied. america was going through an economic crisis. it was extended in two foreign wars. so words were the only real weapon he had at the time. he extended rhetorically an open hand to some of the dictators in the region. they responded with a closed fist. so now he finds himself in a position he has to act and ironically, he has put himself in that position to some degree with saying assad has to go and saying a red line if assad uses chemical weapons against his own people, there will be consequences. the president's own words now force him into action. it's hard to see
zinni, you oversaw bill clinton's attempt to kill osama bin laden in 2008 and you warned against president bush's mistakes in iraq. do you believe that president obama is on the verge of making a mistake in syria? >> i think, you know, he's made the commitment and he's put down the red line, and i think it's inevitable now that he has to follow through. if -- to not follow through would embolden assad and tell him he could use chemical weapons. i would make one point, which is really critical here, this is not about supporting the united states or a united states move. this is about the chemical weapons convention. 191 countries signed on to this, including the british and others, and i think that the administration should have made a better case that this is sort of separate from involvement in long-term in this civil war. it's about enforcement of something that 191 countries signed on and only five countries have refused to do it. >> well, i think the president has tried to make that -- we'll get back to that in a moment. let me ask colonel leighton, the white house released i
. the most famous of all in 1998 when they were launched at osama bin laden in afghanistan only to have three years later launch the 911 attacks against the u.s. >> you're right, indeed. thank you, mick. joining me in studio, congressman gregory meeks, a member of the house foreign affairs committee. representative meeks, i understand you were briefed last night in a conference call. tell me what you learned from that call. >> i learned, first of all, the president has not made a decision yet, which i think is a good thing. >> contingent upon what? do you know what it is will be the tipping point? >> i don't know what it is. i hope he looks at it in its totality. you know, i was with the president most of the time. but i said from the beginning what is beginning is what should be the united states doing something unilateral. what is concerning me is all the reporting i'm hearing now. it's not the international community, it's the united states. it's not nato, it is the united states. >> france said they will offer support. >> there's so many other countries. we don't know, for example, where
but the country's capacity for self-inflself-infl icted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and he points out there is always a nightmare for example of acquiring, terrorists acquiring weapons of mass distraction but nothing would give the terrorists and a greater satisfaction than we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict their lives and liberties accordingly. >> guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it since 9/11 the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries has remained frankly open and free. we have continued to have super bowls and have continued to have people travel abroad. we have robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action i would use the analogy is like a hurricane. we have weather forecast that says there is going to be a storm and we are battening down the hatches and if you live in these places as the storm passes , great but this administration is leaning forward in a way that i think is professionally responsible and they are being advise
generally worked against al qaeda, osama bin laden being the most prominent example. other members of core al qaeda. and al qaeda-affiliated elements. >> there were three associated forces when you're in office. >> those were the three that i had the occasion to evaluate most often. here were other instances when i would conduct a legal evaluation where we did not go forward with a specific operation, but those are the three most prominent examples that we regularly briefed to congress. you referred to my oxford speech. i think we are at an inflection point as one journalist put it where we should no longer consider ourselves in a traditional armed conflict against al qaeda and affiliated groups. i think benghazi is a prominent example of what i am talking about. you cannot label the benghazi attacked as something conducted by al qaeda and associated forces. it was more of a mixed bag. in this period where we're head in addition new direction, we need to evaluate in congress what new authorities our counterterrorism professionals might need. and we're not just talking about drone strikes.
what it had to do. you saw president clinton went around all his allies, nato or the u.n., after osama bin laden blew up those east africa embassies in 1998. there's been very limited alliances hitting saddam hussein over various years during the late '90s. there is precedent to this. >> jimmy carter and his carter center in atlanta, peter, they put out a statement earlier today before the secretary of state's comments, before the intelligence assessment release, certainly before the president just spoke at the white house. among other things, the jimmy carter center said this. a punitive military response without a u.n. security councilman date or broad support from nato and the arab league would be illegal under international law and unlikely to alter the course of the war. what do you make of that, peter? >> you know, something can be illegal under international law but still be a le wrgitimate usf force which may seem like a paradox. certainly there is going to be no u.n. resolution. there will not be it looks like a nato kind of collective security article 5 type thing where, you
at the take-down of osama bin laden, when they came in one of the helicopters crashed but they had backup helicopters as a contingency plan. so that's all this is. no plans to put any marines on the ground anywhere and they don't even really see that that's a likelihood or even could happen by accident. >> okay. what are they talking about at the pentagon in terms of the timing of an assault? as you know, we had senator john mccain saying this could be a one-day event. in the pentagon, is there a suggestion maybe a multi-day or are they being definitive about that at all? >> well, it could be a one-day event if, in fact, these tomahawk cruise missiles are so accurate and they take out most, if not all of the targets that were originally aimed for. but usually, you know, after the smoke clears and the satellites hover overhead and they say oh, we missed this, we missed that, and there could be a cleanup strike for at least one day, and then perhaps a third. but people are looking generally at one, possibly two days. it would probably be extraordinary for three. but you know, that's always
to do. of you, osama bin laden is no more. because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. core of al qaeda, in afghanistan and pakistan, is on its way to defeat. that happened because of you. because of you, more afghans are reclaiming their immunities, markets, schools, their towns, and they have a chance to forge their own future. areuse of you, more afghans trained and stepping up in defending their own country. and preserving the gains we -- you fought and fled for, we will ensure afghan is never again a source of attack against our country. applause]d that happened because of you. the war in afghanistan will and for you, that means fewer deployments, training time, getting back to what marines do better than anyone else on earth. it means more time here on the homefront with your families, your wives, your husband, your kids. , the end of the war in afghanistan does not mean the end of threats to our nation. as i have said before, he's an -- even as we decimated the al qaeda leadership that attacked us on 9/11, al qaeda affiliates and like-minded extremists still threaten
, the current deputy manager at "politico." she has overseen the stories of ,he killing of osama bin laden of the president's reelection campaign and you may know her from her great work with the politics team at usa today and the managing editor of the american journalism review. next to rachel is jen pendry and who is not on your program. originally we were going to have an al jazeera reporter here but she has gone over to the mainstream and is now working for cnn, making her ineligible for the panel. so jen kindly agreed to step in and we appreciate that. she is the white house reporter for the huffington post and covers leadership on capitol hill. she joined huffington post a couple of years ago and spent years covering the legislative and executive branches of government for "rollcall." probably a walk in the park for her because she started covering the texas state legislature. again, stepping in for camille, so thank you for that. next to jen is john stanton who also has "rollcall" roots. he is the chair of buzz feed here in washington. smith, the editor described him as a reporter'
people would say that president obama had every right to launch the raid that killed osama bin laden. history does demonstrate the forces of diplomacy coexist, they interact with each other and they sometimes and complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would've been able to secure the peace at dayton, the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian army that were not going to commit them to continue to kill innocent muslims but it was a just a force that she'd a cease-fire and drove them to negotiating table were holbrooke worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when have to rely on the military and where fortunate as all of you know to have extraordinary young men and women in our military come in the army, the navy and air force, marines and coast guard and the national guard. [applause] wiland like you just applaud, i admire the american military. they are absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moments of m
boasting how he got osama bin laden. sure we might miss going after assad. but you might hit him. and if you do, you end the civil war. >> i also would thinks one thing about charles's philosophy is solid, of course he's the deepest thinker you know. but there is something about a guy who lives in a palace who if you could destroy the pal lasz, take out the department of commerce, he's living a life of luxury. he didn't feel the war. if he's sleeping on a mattress and working off stack tables, i think he'll start to feel some of the pain of this ongoing civil war. i think that would send a message. >> make him feel like college student. >> i bet a lot of money on the fact that that is not the plan they're crafting. i think it will be less severe, just try and do something to send a message before they would go anywhere near trying to take out assad. >> ralph peters writes you might as well teach a snake to juggle as have the obama administration think strategically. so stand by. >>> now the latest on the senseless murder of world war ii hero delbert belton. the second suspect cau
, is you have to knock out these people. president obama did it with osama bin laden who was not a leader of a nation, but a leader of the al qaeda movement. the united states did it with saddam hussein. one of the questions, and it is a difficult and collocated question, and i do not want to pretend this is a self-evident answer in terms of what to do, is if i thought is gone, what is an openm? that question. you have analysts on both side of the issue that argue on the key question, which is how strong are the relatively moderate rebel forces in syria? theypeople say because were not aided earlier, they are too weak now and there's not much hope that they could help others, like one of the strategys of the surge actually said that rebel forces that are relatively moderate are fairly strong and we could make a difference. david up next from north carolina. good morning. caller: actually, that is wilson, north carolina. i would like to thank you for being so moderate. your art to a great job interviewing him. it is still speculation that this has not used chemical weapons against his own
they were funded, where the training camps were. on 9/11 we did not know that. we knew osama bin laden was back, but that was the extent of our knowledge. the way we kept the country safe was get that intelligence and according to the agency itself, the way we did that was by subjecting him --because he was ejected more than anybody else -- to enhanced integration techniques. this administration does not get it. they do not. obama made a speech here not too long ago to the national defense and basicallymay said ok, now we are returning back to the tree-9/11 days. we are not at war anymore. we are going back to pre-9/11. we will go try to round up the guys when they blow up. we are no longer on a war footing, if you will, in terms of thinking about the state we're in. i think that is dead wrong. totalan absolute misreading of where we find ourselves today. as i look at that part of the world am a north africa, a good part of the middle east, not just afghanistan, where they launched 9/11 from, but also yemen and the major struggle underway in egypt, the muslim there,hood taken power th
would say that president obama had every right to launch the abbottabad raid that killed osama bin laden. history does demonstrate that its diplomacy coexist they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke the late richard holbrooke great american diplomat. i don't think he would you woule been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to let them continue to kill innocent muslims. in fact the use of force achieved a cease of fire drove them to the negotiating table where holbrooke worked his magic and brought to peace to bosnia after five years of war. their times we have to rely on our military and we are fortunate as all of you know to have extraordinary young men and women in our military in the army navy air air force marines and the coast guard in the national guard. [applause] and like you who just applauded i admired the american military. they're absolutely critical to our security. one of the proudest moment of my career was when i served as
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)